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The Basics of Worker's Compensation Law

Christopher Lane, Attorney, North Carolina


Christopher Lane is an attorney in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Since 2002, he has run a solo law practice at which he manages employment, worker’s compensation, real estate, and personal injury suits. It was during his eight years as an associate attorney for McElwee Firm in North Wilkesboro, North Carolina that Chris Lane gained his initial experience in worker’s compensation law.

A worker’s compensation case is different from other legal suits because no one in particular is at fault. Employers pay for potential compensation cases through their insurance, and employees are not expected to pay into this fund.

When a worker is hurt on the job, assuming they were not intoxicated, the amount they receive through worker’s compensation is based on the injury, not on the carelessness or negligence of employee or employer.

In cases where cause is less clear, the employer and insurance provider must deem the accident work-related. If there is a discrepancy between employer (or insurance) and employee, a worker’s compensation lawyer may be retained, and the case may be put before a judge. The employee receives no payments for compensation or time off work until the case is resolved.

Workers deemed to have been hurt on the job will have their medical or hospital bills and rehabilitation costs paid for by the insurance company. The insurance will also cover the days they are unable to work. If an employee can return to work only part time, the insurance company may cover the income they are losing.

Christopher Lane is an attorney in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Since 2002, he has run a solo law practice at which he manages employment, worker’s compensation, real estate, and personal injury suits. It was during his eight years as an associate attorney for McElwee Firm in North Wilkesboro, North Carolina that Chris Lane gained his initial experience in worker’s compensation law.

A worker’s compensation case is different from other legal suits because no one in particular is at fault. Employers pay for potential compensation cases through their insurance, and employees are not expected to pay into this fund.
When a worker is hurt on the job, assuming they were not intoxicated, the amount they receive through worker’s compensation is based on the injury, not on the carelessness or negligence of employee or employer.
In cases where cause is less clear, the employer and insurance provider must deem the accident work-related. If there is a discrepancy between employer (or insurance) and employee, a worker’s compensation lawyer may be retained, and the case may be put before a judge. The employee receives no payments for compensation or time off work until the case is resolved.
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